Archive for Freedom

Idle No More Victoria BC. Year end protest in pictures.

Posted in Activism, Anarchism, Canada, Economy, Environment, Food, Food For Thought, Health, Idle No More, Justice, Law, Photography, Politics, Racism, Social Justice, Society, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 31, 2012 by animal_static

It has been a long time since my last post!  My semester is finished and I finally have time to write something that I am not being graded on.  Not that I would expect anyone to read anything that I say without a critical lens.  I would be disappointed if that were the case.

It has been a busy couple of months and a lot of things have happened.  American elections, mass shootings, omnibus legislation, gun control, shady trade deals, attempted genocides, disastrous disaster relief, European general strikes, and the end of the Mayan Calendar just to name a few items that immediately come to mind.  It’s a lot, and arguably too much negativity on the global scale given that my last post was only in the first week of November.  Maybe it is the approach of 2013 but it feels like things are changing.  Negativity and hate are on the rise but are also accompanied by reactionary social awareness and action.  People are taking to the streets in greater numbers and at a greater frequency than I can remember.  Someone somewhere once said that things become more apparent as you immerse yourself in your reality.  Perhaps it is an increasingly critical political appraisal that comes with a personal struggle to understand what anarchism means to me that is bringing all of this action into focus or perhaps people everywhere have simply had enough.  It’s probably a little of the former and a lot of the latter.  We all have a personal and collective threshold of values which can and have seemingly been crossed for people all over the world.

Enough preamble.  I attended the Idle No More event yesterday (December 30) in Victoria BC and I wanted to share a few pictures of my last protest event of 2012.  The message is important, the weather was great, and so was the turnout.  It is always amazing witness the sense of community that emerges during such events.  The ongoing nature of Idle No More might actually give us a chance to foster this sense of community beyond the next rally, panel, action, etc., into something deservedly lasting.  Let’s hope.

I have a head cold right now and am wary of committing any more words to paper or screen so here are some pics for you.  Please ignore the time stamp. My camera is old and seems to think it is 2010.  I too found this alarming but thorough experimentation has revealed that my 8 mega pixle wonder is indeed NOT a time machine.  Alas

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Happy New Years everyone

Comments and sharing are always welcome

Static_Animal

Some Thoughts About Tomorrows Defend Our Coast Action, Victoria BC

Posted in Activism, Canada, Economy, Environment, Food For Thought, Industry, Justice, Law, News, Politics, Social Justice, Society, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2012 by animal_static

Life is busy business when you try to balance school and reality (not synonymous).  It has been a couple of weeks since my last post but there is something interesting happening tomorrow that I have been thinking about a lot lately.  The Defend Our Coast, anti-pipeline event is happening October 22 (tomorrow) in Victoria BC.  Very basically, this is a protest to collectively speak out against the looming Enbridge oil pipeline that is looking to link Alberta oil to the Asian market via a line that will span the province of British Columbia and will see increased tanker traffic in a very fragile and very risky shipping route on our beautiful coast.

Image from rabble.ca

I fully support the anti-pipeline message but do have a few concerns around this particular event.  The most prominent criticism would probably be what comes across as a somewhat Eco-centric (nature centred) standpoint with the bulk of project criticisms revolving around environmental concerns.  Spills, climate change, habitat, forests…all that stuff.  These are obviously valid concerns but, to continue the metaphor, it is unfortunate that crucial social concerns often take a back seat when environmental NGO’s get behind the wheel.  If you are out tomorrow or supporting in spirit or text, please remember the voices that are silenced or under represented in events like this.  If there is any population that will suffer negative effects of industrial expansion, legal reform, or environmental degradation, historical statistics tell that it will be Canadian First Nations before any other.  First Nations communities shoulder the brunt of industrial fallout, feel it first,  and will suffer longer than other groups.  Here is where the silencing aspect comes in.  Critics of this statement will cite first nations involvement in the event and thus claim representation.  This is true but hardly a complete view on the matter.  Engagement of the government in the context of this event is to validate the system producing initial inequalities and therefore inadequate to address the colonial oppression that is embedded in our legal system.  Just a thought.

Also,  there is a LOT of attention around the potential arrest of participants in this event.  My advice is do not get yourself arrested at this event.  I am not against legal defiance of this sort and see the value of the statement that it makes in certain situations but I personally don’t feel that this is one of those occasions.  It needs to be considered that protests on legislature grounds are largely symbolic.  You have a right to peaceful assembly and you can do this at legislature under law but your arrest here will only fatten police coffers.  There are big wheels rolling on this pipeline project and your arrest is hardly likely to sway anyone.  The public already supports you and the government will do what it will do.  The current BC premier is a weak one and the liberal party needs your votes, you can rest assured that she is already listening to you.  Finally,  there is something wicked cooking in Ottawa right now that if passed will render useless any recent anti oil actions.  The upcoming Canada-China Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (FIPA) was signed overseas, quietly tabled without a public release and will, if unchallenged, pass into law on Nov 1.  If this happens, the doors will be open for the potential sale of Alberta based, Nexen Oil to the Chinese corp, CNOOC.  The wording of the agreement allows for corporations to take the provincial or federal governments to court should they undertake actions that impede corporate profits.  No pipeline equals loss of profit which equals financial cost to the offending governments which always means that your voice doesn’t matter any longer.  This is really important and very lacking in the language of this event.  Something to think about if you are considering crossing any police lines tomorrow.

Finally, BE AWARE OF YOUR RIGHTS.  Police are manipulative, will take advantage or your ignorance and WILL infringe upon your rights.

You have the right to peaceful assembly.  The legislature is a  public space.  Use it don’t abuse it.

You have the right to remain silent though you do need to identify yourself upon arrest.

You have the right to be free from search and seizure.  If you are not under arrest, committing a crime, or suspected of committing a crime, you do not have to let police search your bags.  They will try to make this seem to be otherwise but this is indeed your right.  Don’t take off your bag, gesture to your bag, or verbally engage in consenting language.  I personally would stick on this one as a matter of principle.  Be polite about this though or you are going to pay for it.  A “f*ck you pig” will result in a breach of peace offense or something worse.

Finally, you do have the right to photograph or record in a public space.  Police will often tell you to stop.  You don’t have to and please don’t.  People needs records of events and misconduct.  That said, if you are in a cops face when they are arresting someone or otherwise trying to perform their duties, you are obstructing.  This will get you into loads of trouble.  Use your head please.

My next entry will regale you with tales of conflict and courage as they unravel under the lens of my trusty camera at tomorrows event which promises to be very exciting.

here is the link to the FIPA (legalese):  http://www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/fipa-apie/index.aspx?view=d

Defend Our Coast page:  http://defendourcoast.ca/

Comments and sharing are always welcome,

AnimalStatic

Lets Talk About Transformative Justice…..YAY!?

Posted in Academics, Food For Thought, Justice, Politics, Racism, Research Tools, Social Justice, Society, Sociology, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 24, 2012 by animal_static

In order to talk about Transformative Justice we need to clear a few points first in order to provide some context.

Firstly, The system that we in North America (arguably every inch of planet earth) are engaged in is capitalism.  The “capital” in capitalism is the major leverage point for most interactions outside of personal relations and family contexts (also arguable as I cannot guarantee that you are not a professional son/daughter/mother/father). Distribution of resources in most instances is sealed by social contracts.  A valid contract cannot be entered by an agent under extreme duress but it is pretty obvious that most everyone enter into contracts that are to their disadvantage at some point or another.  For example, working for the crappy wages that most jobs pay, cell phone contracts written in blood, and surrendering first and last months rent for that ground floor apartment that smells like old soup and has the security doors don’t work but you really wish they did .  These elements fall into the realm of Distributive Justice which is backed up by a large body law that has been developed to support the rights of the money holders and to “protect” the rights of the masses.  Do you feel like you are protected?  I sure don’t.

What we can now observe is the evolution of a system that has seen the increasing dominance of the top 1% of earners  while the rest of us have been left out to dry.  We have been sold the individualist dream of rat race resource attainment.  The bar of illusory social mobility has been set high and regardless of statistics that say the bottom 10% of earners have a 0.25% chance of reaching upper middle class, most of us still jump just as high as we can.  People have been stripped of any kind of supportive solidarity and set adrift in a sea of resource scarcity where our successes and failures are ours and ours alone. Scarcity breeds desperation which in turn breeds “crime”.  Resources can include, money, food, health, the absence of fear, system security, and a million other things that fit your individual “needs”.

Image obtained from: http://blog.greens.org

So the stage has been set for the incarceration of the young, the poor, uneducated, racialized, mentally ill, abused and otherwise oppressed portions of our society to fill the majority of our prisons. It is not difficult or far fetched to envision full prisons which utilize our disproportionately taxed incomes for providing three meals a day plus supervision for that one time pot dealer who couldn’t find a job for any of the above mentioned reasons, or for the dad who cheats the welfare system because his part time job at Wal-Mart pays squat and the kids need to eat.  Unless you have killed someone, it is at this point that the system decides how to “fix” you.

Up until recently, alternative programs have pursued a path of “Restorative Justice” where offenders reconcile with victims and the community gets its piece of the action too through the involvement of church groups, and neighbourhood committees, etc.  The ideal end result is the restoration of a criminally deviant individual into a contributing member of society who is ready to go out and pay some taxes while not assaulting or stealing anything.  Sound awesome? Maybe until you consider that these programs are often offered to individuals who forgo due process in favor of reduced sentences and engage with mediators whose supposed neutrality is erased by the fact that the offenders participation has been coerced through system manipulation. The only way for the offender to successfully navigate the process is to engage in language that validates the oppressing system.  The biggest point of consideration here is that an offender is being “restored” through the justice system to a normalized status within a society that is  by its nature unjust.

Relatively recently, Transformative theory has acknowledged these flaws in restorative justice and seeks to remedy its shortcomings by introducing critical analysis of the system that creates the environment within which the crime occurred in the first place.  In this type of model, you can have the same victim/offender/community interaction with a mediator who has no pretense of neutrality but instead serves as a kind of guide where a more complex understanding of the offense and its relations to the victim can be contrasted against a historical and systematic backdrop.  If you consider the percentage of the Canadian inmate population who claim first nations status, an approach that incorporates cultural sensitivity and the acknowledgment (positive) of historical oppression and  different ways of knowing has great potential.  Despite a human factor that is desperately needed in current legal process there are some holes in the practical aspects of transformative theory which negate its potential as a dominant model for justice within the legal system.  Some of the blame for certain crimes should obviously be shifted onto a system that is so stifling to vulnerable populations but until the entirety of the global capitalist system is overhauled this approach to justice seems akin to throwing small stones at a large mountain.  You can make a lot of noise but you’re not going move much.  And worse yet, if you throw that stone just right you might just attract the baleful eye of whatever bureaucrat is in charge of stamping your grant application.  Such is the peril of fighting within the system.

Comments and sharing are always welcome,

Animal_Static

Why We Should Listen to What George Monbiot Has to Say, A Book Review.

Posted in Activism, Books, Economy, Environment, Food For Thought, Politics, Social Justice, Society, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 27, 2012 by animal_static

I know that I posted a book review a few weeks ago but I am trying to cram in as much extra curricular reading as possible before I get locked into another eight months of academia.  Not to say that I don’t love what I choose to study but there is something to be said for freedom of choice.  I just finished a somewhat current (2009) volume by George Monbiot entitled, “Bring on the Apocalypse, Six Arguments For Global Justice”, which is definitely worth a read.  Monbiot is of the idea that the Right Wing approach to government which is prevalent in the most powerful (Western/Northern/G8) nations has enabled and cultivated social and environmental scenarios that are contributing to the ultimate demise of the planet and creating an expanding social divide between the rich and the poor.  I agree.

Image from bookrabbit.com

The world is not what it seems, you are being lied to but the truth is out there and George would like to help you find it.  Government and media (sometimes synonymous) are experts at altering our perceived social and environmental realities.  We are stripped of collective identity and told that individualist consumer oriented goals (buy that house, car, second car, second house, lest you be left behind and find yourself worthless) are what we should be striving for.  Environmental disasters are downplayed or swept under the rug, an unsustainable auto industry is lionized as a true expression of freedom, social movements are under reported, and your governmental policies ARE being dictated by industrial lobbyist groups.  It’s all quite negatively overwhelming.  Luckily there are activists like Monbiot who are able to present us with some well thought out ideas that help to strip some of the veneer from the right-wing neoliberal agenda.  There are going to be some right-libertarians out there who will state that unbridled free markets are the ultimate expression of personal freedom but guess what;  that path has yielded enough blood and horror to prove it an inhuman pursuit.  Lets ask Chile, Argentina, and virtually every indigenous population on earth how they feel about it.

Image from redmolotov.com

The “arguments” in this book are collections of essays which fall under the categories of God, Nature, War, Power, Money, and Culture.  While not hitting the nail on the head with every single essay, Monbiot does a fantastic job of exposing some of the cracks in the informational facade that we are presented with by the government and media via popular news venues and “democratic” process .  Like all books dealing with current issues this one too shall eventually fall by the wayside but will not find itself in the tar pits of literary history.  The sentiments expressed within are valid critiques of problems that have thwarted humanity in one form or another since the arrival of surplus commodities which have freed parts of the population from the labour pool thus enabling religious/cultural pursuits and unbalanced power dynamics.  These easily accessible essays provide a decent foundation from which one can step stone to more in-depth critiques of sociopolitical factors that do affect most aspects of our lives and for that reason alone this book is quite valuable.

Not trying to be punny here but anyone willing to take on issues like the Vatican’s bigoted obsession with homosexuality, Americas love affair with oil and torture, the British governments submissive relationship with big business, shoddy climate change science, and media manipulation is OK in my book.  This is a guy who knows a lot about a lot of things that matter and has not been bought, hence a guy worth listening to, but as with all things, you decide.

I would love to hear what you think.

Cheers.

AnimalStatic

Online Security, Safety for the Mobile Activist

Posted in Activism, Blogging, Food For Thought, Online, Politics, Security, Society, Surveillance, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on July 4, 2012 by animal_static

I would like to post a brief addendum to my last blog entry which focused on anonymous blogging.  The following article presented by “Access”, a group dedicated to furthering digital freedom and human rights in the 21st century, is an informative guide regarding online security.  Smart usage of Web browsers, proxies, social networking sites, and mobile devices are all discussed in detail.

Image taken from Access.org

Link to the text only article, “A Practical Guide to Protecting Your Identity and Security Online and When Using Mobile Phones” can be found here:

https://www.accessnow.org/policy-activism/press-blog/protecting-your-security-online-english-text-only1

This page also contains options for pdf downloads with at least one non-English selection

Please comment and share thoughts and ideas.

-AnimalStatic